Integrated Veterinary Care Initiative

The Integrated Veterinary Care Initiative & Your Practice

The Integrated Veterinary Care Initiative (IVCI) is a resource that demonstrates how clinical canine massage, a science-based complementary therapy, by working alongside veterinary practices, informing of findings and comparing information we can together ensure that dogs receive optimal care and support.

To assist you in recommending clinical canine massage to your clients the Canine Massage Guild has produced an information pack for your practice and a ‘What’s your dog trying to tell you?’ guide for your clients. The brochure details the educational and professional standards I follow as well as my continuing professional development requirements, code of ethics and conduct.

I would be very pleased to come and give an informal ‘lunch n’ learn’ talk or a more formal presentation at your practice.

Integrated Veterinary Care Initiative
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Working Together

I abide by the Veterinary Surgeons Act 1966 and Exemptions Order 2015 and never work on an animal without veterinary consent. Canine massage is an affordable treatment that not only assists dogs and their owners through recovery, recuperation and rehabilitation, it can also be used in preventative healthcare; helping dogs to maintain a happy and healthy life. By working closely with vets, physios and other therapists in a multimodal approach we can achieve the best possible results for the welfare of the dogs we treat.

Clinical Trials Contributor

Published Research

Through 2018-2019 Sparsholt and Winchester Universities are carrying out clinical trials on our clinical canine massage therapy with particular focus on the Lenton Method® which incorporates a systematic and scientific method of advanced palpation skills to isolate the muscles and fascia for assessment and a unique set of direct myofascial release techniques that rehabilitate musculoskeletal injuries and provide chronic pain management for orthopaedic conditions such as arthritis and hip dysplasia.

Research results, papers and conferences will be published on the Canine Massage Guild website as they become available. Click here for further information in the Vet Times.

For further information on the Canine Massage Guild and the IVCI click here.